Next Mommarazzi!™ Photo Workshop Date Announced!!

Mommarazzi!™ Photo Workshop
by Cain Images

Saturday May 6, 2017 10am

Tyler State Park

Newtown, Pa.

Cost $35 Per Mom and Child
$40 Mom and Two Children
Each Additional Child $5

 

MOMMARAZZI!™ – Definition: A mom who owns a nice camera and is constantly photographing her kids. Have you had issues while trying to make good photographs of your children? The beautiful Tyler State Park in Newtown, Pennsylvania will serve as the backdrop for this workshop designed to improve your picture making skills while photographing our most precious subjects. We’ll discuss lenses, movement, keeping the child’s attention, ISO choices, backdrops, lighting options, etc…
You can use a DSLR or Point and Shoot for this workshop.

Dentist Cares For HIV Patients

This is from an unpublished photo essay I worked on in 1989 at the Infectious Disease Clinic at Temple University. I spent a few days following around Dr. Michael Glick, who had started the IDC a year earlier. No one in the Philadelphia region was offering dental care to HIV patients at the time. Click and his staff were the only ones doing so that I had found at that time. Here are some archive images, from way back then.

HTML 5 Version Slideshow:


Hey! That’s my photo!!

A few months ago I was made aware of a school that had pulled one of my images from a clients website and then used it on their website with a press release. I won’t mention names, but let’s say it was a school that could afford to have purchased a usage license.

When I saw the unauthorized use, I wasn’t surprised that it had happened. In my experience, people tend to think if something was published online, it is in the public domain. Not true. The author owns the copyright. This means that if someone, even the subject of the photograph, wants to use the image in any other way they must receive permission from the original author of
the photograph. Plain and simple.

In this case, the image was registered with the US Copyright office. All I really wanted was for the school to admit they had done something wrong and apologize. And that is what I expected when I emailed the communications department. The email that I sent basically asked how they had received the image as well as permission to use the image. If they didn’t have permission or a license for the use I’d be happy to sell them a license to use the image on their site.

I assumed they’d get back to me, play dumb, apologize and remove the image. So, I wait. And wait. And wait.

Two days later I see that my image has been removed from their site, but no response from their communications director. So, I then sent another email which thanked them for removing the image, and also asking where I should send the invoice for the “unauthorized” 9 months of use on their site. Yes. It was on their site for 9 months before it was brought to my attention.

Again. I wait. No response. Four days later I email the communications director saying I would appreciate a response.

Wait another three days. Finally, the communications director gets back to me. Tells me where to send the invoice, but no apology. No excuses. Nothing.

So, I invoiced them $100 for 9 months of use on their website and added another $50 for unauthorized use.
Could I have pursued more? Probably. Would it have been worth it? Probably not.
Fact is that the image really doesn’t have much value other then to the people that pilfered it for reuse. It’s an image that was published with a story on one of the school’s athletic teams. The reality is that the players in the image won’t be moving on to a big college, so the value of the imagery as far as reuse is somewhat limited. The reasoning behind charging the rate that I did was to make a point that people can not pilfer a copyrighted work without paying for it.

Funny thing is that if the school had just asked if they could use it, I probably would have said yes and gave it to them as a non-profit contribution.

I am still waiting for the apology.

How to Watermark Images Using Plum Amazing’s iWatermark Pro

Follow the directions in the video to use this fabulous watermarking program. It will save you much time and effort not having to go into Photoshop or Lightroom to watermark your images. You can also resize the pix as well.

To download and try Plum Amazing’s iWatermark Pro, go here: http://plumamazing.com/index.php?cID=620

Long Before Teen Mom on MTV

Long before Teen Mom hit MTV screens, way back in 1989, while working for the Philadelphia Inquirer I spent a few days at William Tennent High School in Warminster, Pennsylvania making pictures of a program geared to keep Teen Moms in school. The school, and mostly, Centennial School District, set up a day care program so young women that had children while in high school could keep on attending school and get their diploma. It was pretty simple. The girls would drop of their child before classes started, then go to school. They could come back to visit the children any time during the day. Then would pick them up after school and in some cases, actually do their homework in the day care while waiting for the bus ride home.

Here are some of the images from the package I did in 1989. Images were shot with Tri-X film and probably pushed to 1600 ISO in most interiors with Nikon F3’s as camera of choice.

A teen mom does her homework while her daughter has a snack.

 

Teen mom and her daughter leave for school as her mother says good bye.

Teen mom and her daughter play during lunch break.

A group of teen moms share a laugh in the lunch room.

During lunch, a teen mom sets her daughters hair.

A young boy and girl play in the day care area of the high school.

Diaper changing time for a young child of a teen mom.

Teen mom drops off her daughter at day care at the school.

Lunch time in day care.

While her daughter is in day care, a teen mom chats in class with a friend.

A teen mom pours milk into her daughters cereal before leaving for school.

A child kisses her teen mom goodbye after being dropped off for day care.

Teen mom and daughter arrive for school.

Teen mom has a snack with her daughter.

Hundreds gather for candlelight vigil for Gianni Forte

Video that I made last night at the candle light vigil for 13 year old Gianni Forte, who was killed in an ATV accident last weekend.
Hundreds of community members came out to show their love and support for Gianni, his family and friends.
I spoke with his grandmother, who explained that Gianni was not allowed to ride without a helmet or on the street. Very sad story. One of the tougher things to photograph.

Villanova Defeats IUP 94-49 at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia

On Saturday I photographed the Villanova and Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) basketball game at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. Villanova won the game 94-49.  The team unveiled their 2016 NCAA Final Four Championship banner in a ceremony before tipoff.
Here is a slideshow.


Full gallery available at: http://cainimages.photoshelter.com/gallery/IUP-vs-Villanova-at-Wells-Fargo-Center/G0000mIWZafkQ4NA/C0000A6_tA8BOb6M

Teacher Shows How to Create Fun Funerals

Kyle Tevlin dresses as the grim reaper to start her fun funeral planning class Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin dresses as the grim reaper to start her fun funeral planning class Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin speaks with her class on how to start fun funeral planning Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin speaks with her class on how to start fun funeral planning Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Alice Lerro (center) of North Wales, Pennsylvania listens as Kyle Tevlin (right) speaks about how to start fun funeral planning Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Alice Lerro (center) of North Wales, Pennsylvania listens as Kyle Tevlin (right) speaks about how to start fun funeral planning Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin dresses as the grim reaper to start her fun funeral planning class Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin dresses as the grim reaper to start her fun funeral planning class Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin speaks with her class on how to start fun funeral planning Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Kyle Tevlin speaks with her class on how to start fun funeral planning Wednesday, October 19, 2016 at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Devlin runs a Devon-based, personal-planning business that finds creative ways to hold funerals and memorials at places that meant something to the deceased, whether that’s a beach or a bar. (WILLIAM THOMAS CAIN / For The Philadelphia Inquirer) (William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

Blessing of Pets Ceremony at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie

Yesterday, I photographed Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo, pastor of St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie as he held a blessing of the pets ceremony.

From left, Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo blesses Cooper the dog as his owner, Calkins Media's Garden Minute host Tina Sottolano-Cain looks on during a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen's United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

From left, Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo blesses Cooper the dog as his owner, Calkins Media’s Garden Minute host Tina Sottolano-Cain looks on during a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo (left) blesses a dog named Vixen during a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen's United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo (left) blesses a dog named Vixen during a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo conducts a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen's United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo conducts a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo (right) conducts a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen's United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo (right) conducts a blessing of pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Brooke Alexander holds her dog Shadow in her lap as Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo (not seen) conducted a blessing of pets Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen's United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

Brooke Alexander holds her dog Shadow in her lap as Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo (not seen) conducted a blessing of pets Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

From left, Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo blesses Brooke Alexander's dog Shadow and Nolan Wimmer's dog Jaxon during a blessing of the pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen's United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

From left, Rev. Jeffrey A. Wargo blesses Brooke Alexander’s dog Shadow and Nolan Wimmer’s dog Jaxon during a blessing of the pets ceremony Sunday, October 23, 2016 at St. Stephen’s United Church of Christ in Perkasie, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

 

 

Senior care in their “Home Sweet Home”

DOYLESTOWN, PA -  FEBRUARY  19: Staff members at At Home Certified Senior Healthcare pose with Marge the Mannequin on the porch February 19, 2014 in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

DOYLESTOWN, PA – FEBRUARY 19: Staff members at At Home Certified Senior Healthcare pose with Marge the Mannequin on the porch February 19, 2014 in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Cain Images)

 

Once again, as in the past 6 years, At Home Certified Senior Healthcare has been voted Best of Bucks in Healthcare. Owner and CEO Jennifer P. Ellsworth is very proud of that achievement and attributes this to her staff. Most important is the fact that “we have the best caregivers.” They have only been in business for only 7 years. Ellsworth says, “That says something!” about the company and staff.

Their website states, “When your loved ones prefer their home to “the Home.” It is a statement that is the basis for the care that the staff at AHCSH offers to patients and clients. The staff helps senior citizens “age in place” so they can grow old in their home or the home of a family member. AHCSH helps navigate the steps to facilitate that for families. The patients receive the medical and non-medical care they require at home. They believe “Home is where the heart is” rings true for all involved.

While remaining at home may be the ideal situation for some, it may not be for others and AHCSH can also help a patient to stay in an assisted living facility.

At Home Certified Senior Healthcare specializes in non-medical caregiving for seniors and people in need. The company offers a wide range of caregiving services for various needs and budgets.

Some of which include, Companion Care where companions almost always become trusted friends, Personal Care for which they specialize in assisting patients with dementia and alzheimer’s.

AHCSH works in tandem with skilled care services to offer:

Palliative Care – Medical care specialized for the seriously ill.

Respite Care – A short-term, temporary care solution for those caring for a family member who would otherwise need permanent placement in an external facility.

Hospice care – Focuses on the terminal or seriously ill patient’s pain and symptoms, as well as attending to their emotional and spiritual needs.

The guiding principle behind AHCSH’s healthcare and medical treatment services is “First Do No Harm.” Whether it be due to a major trauma or end of life issue, they believe that the home-heart connection may be a vital force in a patients well being.

Ellsworth added that they “always have a real live qualified person answer the phone 7 days a week. We are responsive 24-7.” She continued, “We have expert matchmaking to offer a continuum of care from independent living through hospice care in your home environment.”

The services AHCSH offers have been described by clients as a true gift to patients and their families. They are thoughtful and kind when it comes to dealing with their patients.

For long or short term care, basic assistance to hospice, the knowledgeable staff at AHCSH is eager to help and answer any questions you may have about care for you or your loved one.

AHCSH is a Pennsylvania licensed non-medical home care agency. They serve the Bucks, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties and are open 24-7. For other location check the home care Vancouver services. For more information go to www.athomeseniorhealthcare.com or call 215348-1800.

Word of mouth referrals thanks to exceeded expectations

The staff at Burdick's Cleaning pose for a photo August 21, 2015 in Sellersville, Pennsylvania. (Photo by William Thomas Cain)

John Burdick loves what he does for a living. He is the premier carpet and upholstery cleaners in Bucks and Montgomery counties and attributes that to his training and professionalism. John and his wife Meg Burdick are the owners of Burdick’s Cleaning, which has again won Best of Bucks Mont for 2016 in the Home and Garden category.

They have won for five straight years.

Meg Burdick, co-owner of Burdick’s Cleaning, says she attributes it “to many factors, but ultimately it’s great customer service, integrity and trust.”

For Burdick’s Cleaning, great customer service provides value to their clients. A customer can easily schedule for their services via phone, email, text message or Facebook. Meg said, “We educate our customers both over the phone and through social media in an effort help them through a problem and eliminate a service call when possible.” Once they come out for a service call, they offer tips to the client that will help prolong the results and show how to properly care for their carpets as to not void the manufacturers warranty.

The staff always wears booties and lays tarp over flooring, uses corner guards while using a temporary door allowing easy access without letting cool air out or warm air out while stopping bug entry into the home. The company offers warranties for carpet protection and will also do free spot and spill touch ups for one full year.

The words most frequently used to describe Burdick’s Cleaning in feedback from clients is knowledgable and professional. They care about their clients and it shows. The staff attends multiple industry events each year to keep up with the latest innovations to best serve their customers. Meg has even presented to other cleaners at conferences sharing what the company has learned in the industry.

The business is mostly word of mouth and referral based. Meg said, “If you’re not exceeding peoples expectations, the won’t tell others about you.” They have built trust and credibility with their clients and are happy when new customers learn abut them from others. Burdick’s is always straight forward and honest with their customers and stand behind their work while owning up to mistakes. According to Meg, “We aren’t perfect, but it’s all in how you handle the mistakes that sets you apart and sometimes results in even better customer loyalty.”

Burdick’s understands the disruptive nature of having a service provider in your home. They strive to make sure the process is as seamless a disruption as possible. They love hearing a client say “It was a pleasure to have them in their home.” Meg said, “Pleasurable isn’t the first word that comes to mind when it comes to carpet cleaning, but we hear it a lot!”

Their custom software keeps records of all services and email invoices and estimates quickly. They accept various forms of payment.

This is a company that has grown tremendously over the years due to their success and community recognition. They still offer the personal touch to clients as they’ve grown. Meg adds, “We have a phenomenal team. They are vested in our values and represent Burdick’s Cleaning in a way that makes us proud.”

Caring for the beloved pet members of the family

A man walks his dog along the jetty Saturday July 2, 2016 at Higbee Beach in Cape May, New Jersey. Photo by William Thomas Cain/Cain Images

Finding a veterinarian that cares about your pet as much as you do is no easy task. Doylestown Animal Medical Clinic is that place where they refer to your pet as your child.

Dr. Dale Mantell founded Doylestown Animal Medical Clinic in 1983. In the three decades since it has grown into a well-respected facility known for care and professionalism in the Bucks County region.

The DAMC has been at the same location since that time and is owned by Dr. Dale Mantell and Dr. Drew Sporer.

The staff of veterinarians includes some of the finest in their profession who utilize a wide range of the best diagnostic tools and devices available to care for your beloved pet.

Angela Haare, a long time employee of Doylestown Animal Medical Clinic explains, “Our doctors and staff work together with our clients to offer the highest quality medicine coupled with gentle, compassionate care for our patients. We respect the deep connection people have with their pets and carry that with us as we care for their furry family members.”

She added that the staff shares the in the joy as well as sorrow of their clients.

She said, “I can’t tell you the number of times we have stood together shedding tears over the loss of a client pet we have cared for over the years.”

The staff at the DAMC are part of the Doylestown pet loving community. In addition to owning and rescuing pets of their own, they volunteer with animal welfare organizations and pet related community activities such as the Doylestown Dog Park.

The veterinarians and support staff are capable of handling everything from basic care to diagnosing and treating complex issues related to your pet. They maintain strong relationships with the referral centers in the area and work closely with the specialists when needed, to provide the best medical care possible for your pet.

Some of the services they offer are convenient appointments, drop off services, on demand surgery appointments, ultrasounds, pet pedicure, 24 hour access to their pharmacy and much more.

DAMC also offers Preventative Care Plans for your pets.

The Clinic is open Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Doctors are available on Sundays via phone if a message is left before 9 a.m. For after hours, a doctor can be reached up to 10 p.m. Monday to Friday, and Friday until 6 p.m. They will continue booking appointments for your sick or injured pet even after business hours as long as you call before the phones are turned off at end the day.

Haare added, “We love the animals that we see everyday and are honored and humbled by the trust that their owners place in us.”

William Joseph Breish: Inspiring others as Director of Operations at ReStore

William Joseph “B.J.” Breish, has only worked for Habitat for Humanity of Bucks County since 2014, but according to Florence Kawoczka, a manager at Habitat who nominated B.J., he “quickly earned the respect of his staff by sharing his vision for the ReStore operations while showing his general interest in their personal development.”

“He has continued to make adjustments to our daily operations and develop partnerships with a keen eye to making our ReStores a source of sustainable funding,” she added.

Breish has served as the Director of ReStore Operations since 2015, managing the operations of their two ReStore locations. His first ReStore netted $200,000 recently which supports construction of a home for one of the needy families.

Breish feels that Habitat for Humanity of Bucks County is doing amazing things by changing the world for the better. He wishes more people got to experience what he sees every day, because it “puts things in a new and important perspective.”

The ReStore Association of Habitat International considers Reish a trendsetter in illustrating best practices.

Before he joined Habitat for Humanity, Breish worked for Samuel Adams and Impact Thrift. The job at Impact came about because, as a customer, he got to know Paul Baur, the CEO and Founder of Impact Thrift.

He found an interest in what Impact was doing and eventually convinced Paul to give him a job.

Breish says his father, “Inspired me by modeling hard work, dedication and strong values.”

He believes to be, “A GREAT leader, is to genuinely lead to serve and develop others.”

“It also requires a understanding that being a leader doesn’t always equal being right, and making the right decisions,”  he added.

He’s learned a lot from exceptional leaders, and also learned “what not to do” from others.

He said he is motivated every day, by his staff as well as volunteers who continue to grow and inspire him with their sheer will and determination to fulfill their mission and support their community. Another thing that motivates him is his ability to help develop others and support them on a daily basis in many different (and growing) ways.

The Lansdale resident, who has been married to Brianna for the past three years, was a volunteer firefighter for a number of years, but recently has taken a break from that with the birth of his daughter Addison over a year ago.

When asked if he’s liked to give a “shout out” to anyone, B.J. said, “If I know you or have known you, you have inspired me.”

Michael Pecci: WeVeel CEO, of Morrisville, leading through education

Michael Pecci, 40, is the owner of WeVeel LLC, based in Morrisville. The Millstone, New Jersey resident has four children with wife Elizabeth. They are Collin, 20, Nolan, 16, Mara, 12 and Liam, 6. Collin is currently interning at WeVeel.

Mike holds a B.S. from Rutgers University.

Jake Snyder said of Michael Pecci in his nomination letter, “Mike is a natural born leader and has all of the characteristics and qualities that would make someone as such.”

He would have to be when you consider that he only started WeVeel a little over 8 years ago.

In that time, Mike has traveled the world building his business. He was always fascinated with learning, travel and startups and after working in sales and marketing for RJ Reynolds as well as business development for Crayola he decided to start his own venture.

Mike explained that he was influenced by his assistant high school wrestling coaches and many mentors at various companies he has worked along the way. These experiences helped him in his professional development and gave him confidence and knowledge needed to challenge the status quo in every stage of his career. His family has also played a role. Mike said, “My family has always encouraged me to take educated risks and trusted me on each step my never-ending journey.”

When asked what is takes to be a leader, Mike responded, “Today’s leaders need to have vision, be transparent, solution focused and open to diversity of people, perspectives and individual skills. Good leaders should not only be open to change, but should be pioneering new paths and pursing what is next.”

“Where we are is never where we want to be and it is the leadership’s job to stay on track (and) celebrate milestones daily while proactively looking where to go next,” he added.

He is motivated every day by some of the most creative and energetic people he has ever had the pleasure to work with. He describes the work environment as “an environment where sustained innovation can exist.” Mike has a “close and supportive family which motivates me to always do better.”

They recently renovated his historic office building, known as Old Bucks County Contributionship Ins. Building. There are now 24 people in the building and they recently participated in Morrisville Night Out with community members. He said the Morrisville Borough officials have been great to work with and that the downtown district is continuing to be restored and expanded.

“Morrisville is a great town and I now have more invested in the town than my own home because we see this as a great community with awesome history and good people.”

17-year-old cyclist Paige Shumskas of Pipersville is an amateur turned pro

57c6d00a1f5ef-image
She really didn’t want to. Her father insisted.

Five years ago, after the avid runner broke her big toe, Paige Shumskas was signed up for cycling lessons by her father at the Velodrome in Allentown. Her plan was to use cycling as a way to stay in shape until she could get back to running. Then she found she had fallen in love with cycling. She joined a junior development road team that summer. This season she has competed in 50 races.

Come September 11th, Paige will be competing in the women’s pro race Bucks County Classic as the junior development rider of the Fearless Femme pro cycling team. Yes. Pro.

Paige competed in the Bucks County Classic last year, but she said it was at the end of her season, and that she was tired and didn’t fare was well as she would have liked. She then added, “This season I’m more prepared cause I’m racing for a professional team.” She is their junior development rider. She explained that “I mainly work as their domestique” where her basic role is to clog the front of the pack and set the pace for her teammates so they can pull ahead and be in position to win the race. “I do whatever I can to help my teammates win.” said Shumskas.

Paige likes Criterium racing. She is excited about the Doylestown race. “This is like my hometown race. Everyone is going to be there. So I’m really excited for that.” She said last years was different because it wasn’t a pro race. This year the women’s pro race features some of the best women racers in the country.

The season starts between March or May to September. When asked how she manages doing schoolwork during the season, she smiled and said, “I am really good with time management.” Last year she had 3AP classes all with honors. Her instructors will give her work ahead of time so she can manage racing and school work.

The farthest she has traveled for a race was California to compete in Junior Nationals. In that race, someone in front of her purposely took her out of the race, causing her to crash.

She eventually hopes to race internationally in the pro women’s circuit.
She loves Billy Joel, Elton John and Boston.

Today Paige is only doing an hour workout. She’s taking it easy today since she suffered a crash this past weekend when a racer in front of her did something she should’t have and caused a crash from which Paige need 7 stitches. She was happy to report that nothing happened to her bike in the crash and that other then the stitches, she only suffered minor scrapes.

I met Paige at her 14 acre family home in Pipersville. That is the area where she generally trains for races. How can you not? It is beautiful scenery to ride through.

As Paige rides up the road, one doe crosses the road, then another. Further up the road another doe crosses the road following her mother. A car comes closer to Paige. She cautiously waves the vehicle around her. Once past she gets back to work. The Fearless Femme steadily pedals up the scenic hilly road on her way to the next race.

Paige doesn’t want summer to end, saying, “I want to keep racing! It’s so fun!”

September 11, 2016 in Doylestown.

Her hometown race.